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The Liturgical Year

What You Don’t Know About the Assumption

Feast of the Assumption

On August 15th we celebrate the Assumption of Mary, a feast that has been celebrated as far back as the fifth century. In the East the feast is also called "The Dormition" which means "Falling Asleep". This isn't to say that Mary didn't die, both the East and West agree that she did physically die.

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All About St. James the Greater

Saint James the Greater

James drank of the cup Jesus drank of, all too shortly after the Resurrection.  Acts 12:1 tells us that St. James the Greater was one of the first martyrs of the Church. Saint James is known to have died around A.D.  44, by the sword, at the command of Herod Agrippa. Herod Agrippa I, the grandson of Herod the Great who tried to have …

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The Wisdom of John Paul II: Pentecost Sunday and the Eucharist

Happy Birthday, it's Pentecost.

  “When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly a sound came from heaven like the rush of a mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared to them tongues as of fire, distributed and resting on each one of them. And they were all …

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A Most Admirable Life – St. Philip Neri

Saint Philip Neri

“Give me ten men really detached from the world, and I have the heart to believe I could convert the world with them.” – St. Philip Neri Too many people have yet to hear about St. Philip, a man of both simplicity and remarkable effectiveness in preaching the Gospel and leading souls to Our Lord. Recently the great John Henry …

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Saint Isidore, Patron of Farmers

Saint Isidore the Farmer

St. Isidore was born in about 1070 to a poor, but devout family. At a very young age, Isidore hired himself out as a farmer to a wealthy Madrilenian landowner named Juan de Vargas.

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8 Things You May Not Know About Good Friday

8 Things you may not know about Good Friday

It is Good Friday. The day of the Crucifixion. If you haven't seen the movie The Passion of Christ, we recommend it as a solemn preparation for the Good Friday Stations and Service. Here are eight bits of history and tradition about this most somber of days on the liturgical calendar.

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Who is the father of modern education?

Jean Baptiste de La Salle

Also known as the “father of modern education,” Jean Baptiste de La Salle was born at Reims in April, 1651 to a wealthy French family. He was deeply involved with his Catholic faith early on: at age eleven he received the tonsure (the shaving of some or all of the hair off the scalp as a form of religious devotion or humility) and became the Canon of Reims Cathedral at sixteen. De La Salle was ordained a priest when he was 27 and then received a doctorate in theology two years later.

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