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Three Irish Saints - A Guide to Finding Your Spiritual Style

Item Number: 93845

Catalog Code: 9780895557209

Three Irish Saints

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Are you a thinker, a doer, or a lover?

In Three Irish Saints: A Guide to Finding Your Spiritual Style, Dr. Kevin Vost mines ancient and modern sources to reveal what Saints Kevin of Glendalough, Patrick of Ireland, and Brigid of Kildare can teach us about the joys of contemplation, evangelization, and charitable living. Thinking, doing, and loving!

Included is a a simple self-test to find out which spiritual master you are most like.

Would you rather: plop down in your easy chair and enjoy a good book? Celebrate life and the company of others? Engage in long conversations with your close friends?

Vost examines the lives of these three great saints, unearthing the gifts and virtues that made one a thinker, one a doer, and one a lover.

So which one are you?

Read the book. Take the test. And find out.

About the Author:
Kevin Vost, Psy.D. (born 1961) is the author of Memorize the Faith! (And Most Anything Else): Using the Methods of the Great Catholic Medieval Memory Masters and Fit for Eternal Life: A Catholic Approach to Working Out, Eating Right, and Building the Virtues of Fitness Within Your Soul and St. Albert the Great: Champion of Faith and Reason. An advocate of the sound mind in a healthy body credo so dear to the classical philosophers, Dr. Vost, psychologist and physical fitness expert, seeks to share with Catholic audiences how we can heed Christ's call to be perfect in mind, body, and soul.



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St. Brigid of Ireland

St. Brigid of Ireland Feast Day:
Roman Rite Calendar - 02/01

Patron Of: Babies, Blacksmiths, Boatmen, Cattle, Childern Whose Parents Aren't Married, Dairy Workers, Fugitives, Ireland, Mariners, Midwives, Newborn Babies, Nuns, Poets, Poultry Farmers, Sailors, Scholars, Travelers

Also known as

    * Bride
    * Bride of the Isles
    * Bridget of Ireland
    * Bridget
    * Brigid of Kildare
    * Brigit
    * Ffraid
    * Mary of the Gael


    * 1 February
    * 10 June (translation of relics)


    Daughter of Dubtach, pagan Scottish king of Leinster, and Brocca, a Christian Pictish slave who had been baptized by Saint Patrick. Just before Brigid’s birth, her mother was sold to a Druid landowner. Brigid remained with her mother till she was old enough to serve her legal owner Dubtach, her father.

    She grew up marked by her high spirits and tender heart, and as a child, she heard Saint Patrick preach, which she never forgot. She could not bear to see anyone hungry or cold, and to help them, often gave away things that were Dubtach’s. When Dubtach protested, she replied that “Christ dwelt in every creature”. Dubtach tried to sell her to the King of Leinster, and while they bargained, she gave a treasured sword of her father‘s to a leper. Dubtach was about to strike her when Brigid explained she had given the sword to God through the leper, because of its great value. The King, a Christian, forbade Dubtach to strike her, saying “Her merit before God is greater than ours”. Dubtach solved this domestic problem by giving Brigid her freedom.

    Brigid’s aged mother was in charge of her master’s dairy. Brigid took charge ,and often gave away the produce. But the dairy prospered under her (hence her patronage of milk maids, dairy workers, cattle, etc.), and the Druid freed Brigid’s mother.

    Brigid returned to her father, who arranged a marriage for her with a young bard. Bride refused, and to keep her virginity, went to her Bishop, Saint Mel of Ardagh, and took her first vows. Legend says that she prayed that her beauty be taken from her so no one would seek her hand in marriage; her prayer was granted, and she regained her beauty only after making her vows. Another tale says that when Saint Patrick heard her final vows, he mistakenly used the form for ordaining priests. When told of it he replied, “So be it, my son, she is destined for great things.”

    Her first convent started c.468 with seven nuns. At the invitation of bishops, she started convents all over Ireland. She was a great traveler, especially considering the conditions of the time, which led to her patronage of travelers, sailors, etc. Brigid invented the double monastery, the monastery of Kildara, which means Church of the Oak, that she ran on the Liffey river being for both monks and nuns. Saint Conleth became its first bishop; this connection and the installation of a bell that lasted over 1000 years apparently led to her patronage of blacksmiths and those in related fields.


    * 453 at Faughart, County Louth, Ireland


    * 1 February 523 at Kildare, Ireland of natural causes
    * interred in the Kildare cathedral
    * relics transferred to Downpatrick, Ireland in 878 where they were interred with those of Saint Patrick and Saint Columba
    * relics re-discovered on 9 June 1185
    * head removed to Jesuit church in Lisbon, Portugal


    * Pre-Congregation

Name Meaning

    * fiery arrow (= brigid)


    * babies
    * blacksmiths
    * boatmen
    * cattle
    * chicken farmers
    * children whose parents are not married
    * dairymaids
    * dairy workers
    * Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    * fugitives
    * infants
    * Ireland
    * Ivrea, Turin, Italy
    * Leinster, Ireland
    * mariners
    * midwives
    * milk maids
    * newborn babies
    * nuns
    * poets
    * poultry farmers
    * poultry raisers
    * printing presses
    * sailors
    * scholars
    * travellers
    * watermen


    * abbess, usually holding a lamp or candle, often with a cow nearby
    * abbess with her hand on an altar


All information used with permission of the Patron Saint Index.


St. Kevin of Glendalough

St. Kevin of Glendalough Feast Day:
Roman Rite Calendar - 6/03

Patron Of: Archdiose of Dublin, Ireland, Blackbirds, Long Life

Also known as

    * Caoimhghin
    * Coemgen
    * Coemgenus
    * Comegen
    * Keivin
    * Kevin of Glen da locha


    * 3 June


    Son of Coemlog and Coemell, Leinster nobility. Baptized by Saint Cronan of Roscrea, and educated by Saint Petroc of Cornwall from age seven. Lived with monks from age 12. Studied for the priesthood in Cell na Manach (Killnamanagh). Student of Saint Eonagh. Priest, ordained by bishop Lugidus. Monk. Acquaintance of Saint Comgall, Saint Columba, Saint Cannich, and Saint Kieran of Clonmacnois.

    Following his ordination, he lived as a hermit for seven years into a cave at Glendalough, a Bronze Age tomb now known as Saint Kevin’s Bed, to which he was reportedly led by an angel. He wore skins, ate the nettles and herbs that came to hand, and spent his time in prayer. Word of his holiness spread, and he attracted followers, including Saint Moling. Founded the monastery at Glendalough, which included relics brought back during a pilgrimage to Rome, Italy. This house, in turn, founded several others, and around it grew a town which became a see city, though now subsumed into the archdiocese of Dublin. Served as abbot for several years. When he saw that the monastery was well-established, he withdrew to live as a hermit. Four years later, however, he returned to Glendalough at the entreaty of his monk, and served as abbot until his death at age 120. King Colman of Ui Faelain entrusted Kevin with raising his son.

    Noted as a man who did not always like the company of men – but was at home with the animals, as some of the legends surrounding him show.

        * During a drought, Kevin fed his monks with salmon, a symbol of wisdom, brought to him by an otter. When one of the monks considered making gloves out of the otter’s pelt, it left and never returned.
        * Once during Lent, while he held his arms outstretched in prayer, a blackbird laid an egg in the Kevin’s hand. He remained in that position until the baby bird hatched.
        * A cow which habitually licked Kevin’s clothes while the saint was in prayer gave as much milk as 50 other cows.
        * Lacking milk to feed the son of King Colman, Kevin prayed for help. A doe arrived to provide for the baby. When the doe was later killed by a wolf, Kevin chastised the killer; the wolf then provided the milk herself.
        * A young man with severe epilepsy received a vision that he would be cured by eating an apple. There were, however, no apple trees about. Kevin, seeing the lad’s need, ordered a willow to produce apples; twenty yellow apples appeared on the tree.
        * In his old age, King O’Tool of Glendalough made a pet of a goose. As time passed, the goose also became aged and weak, and finally unable to fly. Hearing of Kevin’s sanctity and power, the pagan king sent for him, and asked that he make the beloved goose young. Kevin asked for a payment of whatever land the goose would fly over. As the goose could no longer take flight, O’Toole agreed. When Kevin touched the bird, it grew young, and flew over the entire valley that was used to found the monastery of Glendalough.
        * A boar was being chased by a group of hunters with their dogs. It ran to where Kevin sat praying under a tree, and cowered beside him for protection. When the dogs saw the saint in prayer, they laid on their stomachs, and would not approach the boar. When the hunters decided they would ignore the man and kill the boar, a flock of birds settled in the tree above the praying saint. The hunters took this as a sign, and left man and beast alone.


    * c.498 at the Fort of the White Fountain, Leinster, Ireland


    * 3 June 618 of natural causes


    * 1903 (cultus confirmed)


    * blackbirds
    * Dublin, Ireland, archdiocese of
    * Glendalough, Ireland
    * Ireland


    * blackbirds
    * monk or hermit with a blackbird sitting on his outstretched hand


All information used with permission of the Patron Saint Index.


St. Patrick

St. Patrick Feast Day:
Roman Rite Calendar - 03/17

Patron Of: Against Snakes, Archdiocese of Boston, Archdiocese of Boston, Massachusetts, Archdiocese of Cape Town, South Africa, Archdiocese of New York, Australia, Diocese of Erie, Pennsylvania, Diocese of Fort Worth, Texas, Diocese of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Diocese of Portland, Maine, Diocese of Sacramento, California, Engineers, Fear of Snakes, Ireland, New Zealand, Ophidiophobics, Snake Bite, Toothache, Vermont

Also known as

    * Apostle of Ireland
    * Maewyn Succat
    * Patricius
    * Patrizio


    * 17 March


    Kidnapped from the British mainland around age 16, and shipped to Ireland as a slave. Sent to the mountains as a shepherd, he spent his time in the field in prayer. After six years of this life, he had a dream in which he was commanded to return to Britain; seeing it as a sign, he escaped. He studied in several monasteries in Europe. Ordained a priest and then a bishop. Sent by Pope Celestine to evangelize England, then Ireland, during which his chariot driver was Saint Odran, and Saint Jarlath was one of his spiritual students. In 33 years he effectively converted the Ireland. In the Middle Ages Ireland became known as the Land of Saints, and during the Dark Ages its monasteries were the great repositories of learning in Europe, all a consequence of Patrick’s ministry.


    * between 387 and 390 at Scotland as Maewyn Succat


    * between 461 and 464 at Saul, County Down, Ireland of natural causes


    * Pre-Congregation

Name Meaning

    * warlike (Succat – pagan birth name);
    * noble (Patricius – baptismal name)


    * against fear of snakes
    * against ophidiophobia
    * against snake bites
    * against snakes
    * engineers
    * excluded people
    * ophidiophobics
    * Ireland
    * Nigeria
    * Adelaide, Australia, archdiocese of
    * Armagh, Ireland, archdiocese of
    * Auckland, New Zealand, diocese of
    * Ballarat, Australia, diocese of
    * Boston, Massachusetts, archdiocese of
    * Burlington, Vermont, diocese of
    * Cape Town, South Africa, archdiocese of
    * Dromore, Ireland, diocese of
    * Erie, Pennsylvania, diocese of
    * Fort Worth, Texas, diocese of
    * Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, diocese of
    * Kilmore, Ireland, diocese of
    * Melbourne, Australia, archdiocese of
    * Mymensingh, Bangladesh, diocese of
    * New York, New York, archdiocese of
    * Norwich, Connecticut, diocese of
    * Ottawa, Ontario, archdiocese of
    * Peterborough, Ontario, diocese of
    * Poona, India, diocese of
    * Port Elizabeth, South Africa, diocese of
    * Portland, Maine, diocese of
    * Sacramento, California, diocese of
    * Saint John, New Brunswick, diocese of
    * Thunder Bay, Ontario, diocese of
    * Loiza, Puerto Rico


    * baptismal font
    * demons
    * harp
    * bishop driving snakes before him
    * bishop trampling on snakes
    * snakes
    * cross
    * Purgatory
    * serpent
    * shamrock


All information used with permission of the Patron Saint Index.

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